Biggest Winner 2017

Enrollment is now open for our 10th Annual Biggest Winner Competition!

big-win-8-wksDuring the Competition you will be competing for weekly prizes, a team prize and the GRAND PRIZE of Synergie Body Sculpting Package valued at $899!
The Challenge begins April 20th!
Spaces fill up fast so call today to reserve your spot on the winning team! The best news is when you join the Challenge, you will get your first 8 weeks of the new well program FREE!

2016-teamsFor More Information –
Call Us Today! 541.772.2224

 

Running Dead 5k

We are proud to be, not only sponsoring – but participating, in Southern Oregon Goodwill’s 2016 Running Dead 5k!

Registration is included in the new well‘s exclusive Back to School Boot Camp! 

zombie-blogAbout The Event

The Running Dead 5K is a charity event to benefit Goodwill’s job training programs in the Southern Oregon region including Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath and Lake counties and Siskiyou county in CA.

It’s NOT a timed event, but an experience set to begin at dusk. Zombies can be a bit scary so this is a 12 and over event. It is a non-violent, just-for-fun race. The only grabbing on the course will be for flags — for safety reasons no strollers, bikes, skateboards, or other wheeled equipment is permitted for runners.

The 5K course will culminate with the Apocalypse Party for runners, their supporters and general public at Common Block Brewing Company. The party features music, contests, prizes, food, beverage, vendor, games and contests.

How It Works

If you register as a human, your ultimate goal is to cross the finish line with at least one “life” remaining — you start with a belt with three flags. Humans who survive with one flag will be quarantined and will vie for King of the Survivors. If you sign on as a running zombie, your aim is to collect as many lives (flags) as you can for the purpose of becoming King of the Zombies at the after-party, the Apocalypse Party at Common Block Brewing Company.

It’s an event like no other in Southern Oregon.

Check out our Boot Camp to go from Couch to 5k just in time for October 22!

group-boot-camp

Back to School Boot Camp 2016

boot-camp-logo-201618 WEEK PROGRAM INCLUDES:
  • Weekly nutrition and menu planning classes
  • Personalized eating plan
  • One-on-one counseling
  • Easy and effective exercise circuit
  • Soothing relaxation treatments
  • Synergie massage
  • Weight loss supplement package
  • 10-day Detox system
  • Exercise classes and plans
  • Weekly educational classes
  • Before and after body composition analysis
  • No contract necessary

Every class attendee will be entered to win 1/2 off!

Medford – Thursday, September 8 at 6pm
Limited Space. RSVP 541-772-2224!

Get the flyer here: medford-boot-camp-flyer

New to This Year’s Boot Camp:
Registration in S.O. Goodwill’s Running Dead 5k!

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2015 Boot Camp Stories/Experiences

boot camp pic

“Boot Camp has encouraged me to step outside my comfort zone to exercise. I drive by Table Rock twice a day and have now made it to the top. The first hike I had to stop quite often just to breath. My new goal is to make it to the top with no stops. Each trip has been easier. My strength, stamina and breathing has improved markedly. We all started out as strangers and have become friends. The team captains are supportive and encouraging. At 60+ I even went to a P90X class after Hiking Roxy Anne in the snow. Sure beats sitting home watching TV!”
~Nancy C.

bootcamp
“Boot Camp has refocused my weight loss journey. I was least excited about the detox but it turned out to be my FAVORITE thing. I really enjoyed the structure of the 10 days. The biggest thing I learned was that I CAN resist the temptations. I am not where I want to be, but with the support of the Wellness Consultants, I will get there. Thank you for all your support and exposing me to all the different opportunities (mostly the detox!)”
~Kelly W.bootcamp pics
“My experience with the new well has been a wonderful journey. I’m 75 years old and absolutely do not feel like it! I have more energy, I’ve lost weight, I have more self-esteem and I’ve become so strong! It is not just physically, but also mentally. The staff has been encouraging the whole way. I love the staff; they make me feel so welcome. I am able to do things I haven’t been able to do for a long time. Age doesn’t matter, weight doesn’t matter. The staff is there for you.”
~Bev C.

boot camp 3
“Boot Camp was just what I needed to push and challenge me to be able to stick to a lifestyle change which was something I really needed after years of yo-yo dieting. I came within 3 pounds of my goal, only to gain most of it back over the past year. I have lost almost all of what I gained back and feel better mentally and physically than I have in years. While the program can be a bit intimidating at first, the staff and other members are so supportive and help get you through those tough days! I highly recommend Boot Camp to anyone who is struggling with their weight or feels stuck in a rut!”
~Susan E.

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“What a wonderful program this is! I am having so much fun. I did this to help myself be a better me. It has boosted my self-confidence by completing hikes and exercises I had never done before. The classes were terrific and I learned a lot. The Detox program had me a little worried, but I realized I didn’t need to be. I learned that I like other foods and by the end of it I felt great! The support is amazing and I would do it again. I’ve lost weight and some inches but what I gained is more important: Confidence, strength and friends! Thank you for the amazing experience!”
~Bonnie P.

To Run, or Not to Run

Running season is upon us, and Southern Oregon is fast becoming a destination for popular runs such as The Color Run deemed the happiest 5k on earth, and more challenging but equally fun foot races and obstacle course races.

Running a 5k, 10k, half marathon or even a full marathon may or may not be on your list of goals, but even if it’s not something that you dream of doing, you can benefit from signing up for your first 5k. Training for a run keeps you motivated, encourages a workout plan that, most likely, is different from what you are already doing, and the feeling of accomplishment will probably have you looking for the next opportunity to do it again!

If you’re already a running fan, then you can train to beat your time, push yourself and possibly work your way up to a half or even full marathon.  But if you aren’t a runner, or even have physical ailments that prevent you from running, you can still benefit from walking a 5k, you will just want to be sure that the event you sign up for is a run/walk.

If you are up for the challenge find a run that interests you (try to give yourself at least 1 week for every kilometer you will be running, 5k- 5 weeks, 10k – 10 weeks etc.)  Here is a sample training program that is very popular and well used with great results:

 

Week

Workout 1

Workout 2

Workout 3

1

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 60 seconds of jogging and 90 seconds of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

2

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk. Then alternate 90 seconds of jogging and two minutes of walking for a total of 20 minutes.

3

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards              (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards            (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards              (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards           (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards         (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards        (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards          (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards        (or three minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then do two repetitions of the following:

  • Jog 200 yards            (or 90 seconds)
  • Walk 200 yards           (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 400 yards            (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 400 yards           (or three minutes)

4

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile                 (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile              (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile                (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile               (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile                (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile              (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile                (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile            (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile          (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile            (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile          (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile             (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile          (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile            (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/4 mile                (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile             (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile               (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile             (or 2-1/2 minutes)
  • Jog 1/4 mile               (or 3 minutes)
  • Walk 1/8 mile             (or 90 seconds)
  • Jog 1/2 mile                (or 5 minutes)

5

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile                 (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile              (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile                 (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile               (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile                 (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog two miles (or 20 minutes) with no walking.

6

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 3/4 mile (or 8 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1/2 mile (or 5 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then:

  • Jog 1 mile                (or 10 minutes)
  • Walk 1/4 mile           (or 3 minutes)
  • Jog 1 mile                (or 10 minutes)
Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2-1/4 miles (or 22 minutes) with no walking.

7

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles          (or 25 minutes).

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles     (or 25 minutes).

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.5 miles        (or 25 minutes).

8

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 2.75 miles (or 28 minutes).

9

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).

Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).

The final workout! Congratulations! Brisk five-minute warm-up walk, then jog 3 miles (or 30 minutes).

 

making time for healthy habits

With summertime in full swing and BBQ’s, outings, holidays and gardens demanding our attention, it’s easy to put healthy habits- such as well balanced meals and exercise- on the back burner.  Letting this happen would be a shame after how hard you’ve worked to get where you are today!  Here are some tips to help you make time to take care of your health.

Plan ahead.  Planning your meals for the week (or even just for tomorrow) is a great way to stay healthy.  Start setting aside some time on Sunday (or any day that works for you) to prepare your meals.  If planning for the entire week just doesn’t work for you, then simply set aside a couple minutes every evening and plan for the next day, or the next couple of days.

Schedule in your workouts.  You schedule doctors appointments, dates with friends and meetings, so schedule your exercise on your calendar and make it a priority!

Get plenty of sleep.  Sleep deprivation can contribute to problems like high blood pressure, weight gain and diabetes.  Aim for at least six to eight hours of sleep each night.  This can get tough when the daylight hours are so long, so make sure you’re paying attention from day to day.

Don’t forget that you are a role model.  When your family and friends see you making your health a priority, they will take notice.  By taking care of yourself you can positively impact others around you and even contribute to them becoming healthier!

how much does your stress weigh?

I recently read a story about stress.  No numbers, no research, just a story.  Some people deal with stress better than others, but we all have it in our lives.

The story goes ‘A professor is holding a glass of water and asks his class “How heavy is this glass of water?”  Many answers are called out, but the professor responds to them all by saying “The absolute weight does not matter.  It depends on how long you try to hold it.”’

Stress is the same way.  It can start out manageable, but the longer we hold on to it, the heavier it becomes.  What was once a little worry can quickly grow into an overwhelming ulcer.  It all depends on how long you hold on to the stress, and what you do to control it.  You may not notice how much stress you carry until it starts going away.

The MayoClinic.com recently posted that “Exercise increases your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. But exercise also has some direct stress-busting benefits.  It pumps up your endorphins.  It’s meditation in motion.  It improves your mood.”

Have you noticed when you exercise that you think clearer?  Many runners report that although they might not have initially formed a habit of running with the goal of running to clear their mind, as the habit developed, they found that going on a run helps them think more clearly.  This is due to endorphins, which are released as you exercise.

Running isn’t the only way to exercise, of course.  In fact, meditation is a form of exercise.  For instance, Yoga.  Yoga is a prime example of exercise involving meditation.  Known for its stress reducing effects, Yoga might not be the first thing that enters your mind when you consider a workout, but it is a fantastic example of meditational exercise.

And what about your mood?  When you experience a high level of stress, if you’re like most of us you probably notice your mood becomes less positive, you can be more irritable and small issues can appear bigger than they actually are.  You guessed it, exercise can help here too.  While participating in exercise the endorphins your body releases help elevate your mood, which in turn can decrease the symptoms of your stress, elevating your mood.

Stress can also be a factor of weight gain.  Julie Kokinakes Anderson, RD, National Nutrition Director of the new well®, states “Certain types of stress can actually lead to weight gain, especially around the belly. When we are under strain, our body reacts by increasing production of certain hormones, like Cortisol. Cortisol is an important hormone that regulates blood sugar levels by stimulating insulin release. The end result may be increased appetite, which plays a role in overeating or certain cravings when we are stressed out. The benefit of regular exercise is that it really can have a beneficial effect on normalizing Cortisol levels.”

So how do you start managing stress with exercise?  Slowly.  If you don’t already have a regular exercise routine, don’t jump into exercise like you’re in the middle of training for a marathon.  Begin slowly, a couple times a week visit the gym and walk on the treadmill, gradually moving to jogging or running on the treadmill.  Or find a fitness class that interests you.  Meeting fellow members in classes can help keep you accountable to your workout, and also help ease your stress levels by involving positive communication.

Your workout schedule shouldn’t cause more stress.  Be reasonable when you schedule your workout time.  Don’t schedule in a workout before a huge meeting you still need to prepare for.  Pencil in your workout, but make the commitment to yourself to work out a set number of times per week.  To make a lifestyle change, it is recommended to workout 2-3 times per week.  More than that and you run the risk of wearing yourself out.  Less than 2-3 times a week and you run the risk of losing (or never forming) a workout routine or habit.

Another tip, exercise smart.  If you don’t like running, don’t exercise on the treadmill. Gyms offer a wide array of options for meeting your exercise needs.  From cardio equipment to free weights, weight lifting machines to aerobic classes, Zumba classes to aquatics, there is something for everyone.  Find a couple classes that are interesting to you, try one new machine each week, schedule yourself with a personal trainer who can help take the stress out of developing a workout routine.  Pair your workout with your interests and you’re more likely to keep exercising, and keep your routine fresh, changing it up frequently.

So how much does your stress weigh?  Try the new well, and see if more than just your weight goes away.

what is well rounded wellness?

Most of us know that working out 2-3 times a week is ideal, but what does it mean to have a well-rounded wellness routine?  A wellness routine goes beyond just working out.  You are present in every aspect of your life, and your health should be a focus in each area, too.  A wellness lifestyle is a sustainable lifestyle of wellness. Going to the gym and working out only to go out and gorge yourself later on un-necessary calories doesn’t result in a sustainable lifestyle.  Jumping from one diet to the next doesn’t either.  Your body doesn’t want a yo-yo diet, in fact, it doesn’t want a diet at all.  Getting past the diet mentality is a huge feat.  While weight loss can be a part of your wellness lifestyle, wellness does not equal weight loss.  Understanding that wellness extends into every part of your life moves you in the direction of a well-rounded wellness lifestyle.

In getting past the dieting mentality, most Americans find that sustainable results come from working with a consultant or wellness coach. “The National Weight Control Registry found that of the people who lose weight and keep it off long term, 50% are using structured programs for weight loss,” explains Julie Kokinakes-Anderson, Director of Nutrition for the new well,  “The accountability factor afforded by a wellness consultant goes a long way in establishing and sustaining healthy wellness habits.    Clients come in looking for weight loss, and in the end, find wellness.”

Long term weight loss is really achieved when people achieve wellness.  Finding a healthy lifestyle and maintaining it goes beyond a healthy weight level-it reaches into every realm of your life.  While accountability is one aspect of a healthy wellness routine, it is only one part of the puzzle.  Your wellness routine should involve your entire body.  Not just your core muscles, but your mind.  Not just your abs, but your diet.  As such, there are four elements that need to be included in your wellness lifestyle before it will be sustainable:  Healthy eating, exercise, accountability and relaxation.

The need for accountability is easy to understand in a well-rounded wellness routine.  But relaxation?  “Relaxation affords the mind a chance to rest and recharge, creating a time when your body recovers and revitalizes itself and allows you to continue living your life in a healthy manner,” explains Center Manager for the Grants Pass the new well, Danielle Wirkkala.  “It is easy to think that you will find the time to relax at home, but the reality is that this generally isn’t the case.  Family, work and home life create distractions from time for relaxation.  Finding a wellness routine that includes relaxation time is vital.  At the new well we have a tranquility room that our clients use every time they visit the center.  In combination with the other pillars of our program, relaxation helps our clients to obtain guaranteed weight loss and develop a healthy wellness routine.”

As you begin developing a well-rounded wellness lifestyle, try thinking of the changes you’re making as permanent, rather than a diet or short-term fix.  You aren’t just getting healthy to lose the weight for now.  You aren’t just looking to get in shape for a reunion.  You are looking to extend your life.  And you’re looking to feel better inside and out-all the time!  When wellness is a lifestyle, it becomes a well-rounded routine.

Interested in finding out about a well-rounded wellness lifestyle?  Go to www.thenewwell.com or contact the new well at 888.471.9355.  The 4 pillars of wellness are offered in one location at the new well, affording women the opportunity to create sustainable, guaranteed weight loss every day.  Each client of the new well continuously receives personalized one-on-one consulting with a Certified Wellness Consultant, healthy eating consulting tailored to your specific needs using whole foods for a sustainable lifestyle (rather than pre-packaged meals), use of our 26 minute exercise circuit in a friendly, non-intimidating environment, and tranquility therapy.